Judging Criteria

The judging criteria for the two age groups are slightly different . Please read carefully.

Criteria for Categories 1 to 11

 Open to Years 7-11

The following judging criteria will be applied to the students’ innovation log. The log can contain up to a maximum of 15 A4 pages and should be uploaded as file of no more than 3 Mb.  More details about the Innovation Log structure can be found in the Competition Rules for the TeenTech Awards here underneath How to Enter, Stage 2

Originality of idea . Does the idea or project show creative thinking? Does it stand out from the crowd?Is your idea unique and original? Are there similar solutions for this market? Perhaps your innovation is an alternative to existing solutions or an evolution of an existing solution?

Quality of  research methods and presentation. We will send support material to all registered teams to give you ideas for how to conduct good research.

Clarity of idea. Is the project or idea clearly described? Is the purpose clear? How does the work demonstrate that the team have thoroughly understood the area where they have chosen to work?

Understanding of potential market. Have you clearly identified the market for your idea? Is it a mass or niche market? Who would use it? Who will benefit? What steps did you take to understand people’s needs and the way your innovation could make a difference? Are there any competitive alternatives to your approach? Have you explained why your approach is needed?

Use of industry experts. How did you make use of expert help from industry or academia? Who did you contact and what did you ask them to do? How did you use their advice to improve, develop or change your idea?Do you have plans to continue the relationship with the partners?

International collaboration. If you chose to work with a team in another country, how was the collaboration managed and how well did you work as an international team? What did you gain from the international collaboration? How did it shape your thinking? What problems did you need to overcome?

Skill and thoroughness. How well is the project or idea executed? How much effort has been made to develop the idea? The technical quality of the execution of the idea or project.

Is it doable? How practical is it to take this innovation to the next level? Are there major technology or market dependencies that prevent this innovation being developed into a prototype or achieving production status?

What did the team learn from their experience? Has it changed your thinking in any way? Have you learnt more about a particular area of Science, Technology, Engineering or Maths? Have you been inspired

Criteria for Digital Skills : Cross Category Award

There are few aspects of modern life that are not touched by Information Technology (IT). The innovative entries we have seen in the annual TeenTech Awards are no different and whilst some previous entries have not been outright winners in their category our judges have noted that many have exhibited design and coding skills that really should be celebrated.

So projects entered for categories 1-11 which demonstrate digital skills will be considered as well as stand alone projects.

TeenTech is looking to recognise both excellence in computer programming as well as creativity in the use of IT. Not everyone is an expert programmer so we are looking both for those that have demonstrated superb coding skills, and for those who have taken their understanding of the building blocks of computer programming and have used those in a novel way.

Through this award category, TeenTech hopes to encourage young people to develop the skills that will continue to be the thread that runs through all areas of innovation.

Criteria for Information Literacy Award

All good science and technology is informed by earlier studies and previous research.  We expect all TeenTech projects to carry out research, on and offline, to find out how things work, to identify previous studies and to find innovative solutions for their project.  This award will celebrate how well young people can show that they can be truly information literate researchers as they explore their ideas to make life better, simper or easier.

CILIP have put together some very useful resources to help teachers and students understand effective methods to research projects.

When you enter any of the innovation categories, your work can also be considered for the Research and Information Literacy award as long as you have considered and applied this checklist.

 

  1. Have you written down all the ways you explored your idea, including those which didn’t work? (Resource sheet,Your Aim)
  2. Have you outlined a plan for your research and shown how it cvhanged as you went along? (Resource sheet,Reseach is a Messy Process)
  3. Have you included a list of keywords you used to search books and the internet? (Resource Sheet – Search Strategy)
  4. Have you listed the range of different search engines you used?(Resource Sheet -What Search Engines Are Out There?)
  5. Have you shown that you’ve used both printed resources as well as the internet?
  6. Have you gathered information from an expert and detailed how you made conatct and the questions asked? (Resource sheet – Evaluating the Information)
  7. Have you surveyed your potential customers and explained why your questionaire was effective?(Resource Sheet – How to write an effective questionnaire)
  8. Have you evaluated the results and shown how they support your project? (Resource Sheet – Link Your Project to What your Customer actually wants)
  9. Have you written a bibliography to show all the source inforamtion used?( Resource Sheet -Referencing Your Research) Have you acknowledged any pictures which are not your own?
  10. Have you made sure your ideas are protected . (Resource Sheet How to protect Your Idea)

 

Criteria for Categories 16-19  

Open to Years 12-13 (Please note category 19 open to 11-18) 

The following judging criteria will be applied to the students’ innovation log. The log can contain up to a maximum of 15 A4 pages or presentation slides and should be uploaded as file of no more than 3 MB. More details about the Innovation Log structure can be found in the Competition Rules  underneath How to Enter, Stage 2

Originality of idea. Does the idea or project show creative thinking? Does it stand out from the crowd? Is your idea unique and original? Are there similar solutions for this market? Perhaps your innovation is an alternative to existing solutions or an evolution of an existing solution?

Quality of planning and project management How well have the team planned and managed the whole process

Quality of research methods and presentation. We have put together some helpful research guidelines to support your work. These will be provided when you register at Stage 1

Clarity of idea. Is the project or idea clearly described? Is the purpose clear? How does the work demonstrate that the team has thoroughly understood the area where they have chosen to work?

Quality of Design and appropriateness of materials, mechanical systems, and /or software solutions chosen (For categories 16-19)

Understanding of potential market. Have you clearly identified the market for your idea? Have you shown ability to identify a need or understand a customer requirement and their business needs. Is it a mass or niche market? Who would use it? Who will benefit? What steps did you take to understand people’s needs and the way your innovation could make a difference? Are there any competitive alternatives to your approach? Have you explained why your approach is needed? (For categories (16-19)

Use of industry experts. How did you make use of expert help from industry or academia? Who did you contact and what did you ask them to do? How did you use their advice to improve, develop or change your idea? Do you have plans to continue the relationship with the partners?

Understanding of engineering, scientific, technological principles How well does the project demonstrate a sound knowledge of STEM

International collaboration. If you chose to work with a team in another country, how was the collaboration managed and how well did you work as an international team? What did you gain from the international collaboration? How did it shape your thinking? What problems did you need to overcome?

Skill and thoroughness. How well is the project or idea executed? How much effort has been made to develop the idea? The technical quality of the execution of the idea or project.

Is it doable? How practical is it to take this innovation to the next level? Are there major technology or market dependencies that currently prevent this innovation being developed into a prototype or achieving production status? Have students identified these?

Evaluation of the project and next steps What did the team learn from their experience? What might they have done differently based on their experience? How do they think it could be taken further? Has it changed their thinking in any way? Have they learnt more about a particular area of Science, Technology, Engineering or Maths? Have they been inspired?

Judging criteria for Data science Prize

Criteria 1 = Used a dataset provided by TeenTech

Criteria 1a = Chose to collect their own data.

1.Understanding of Problem/Data (score 1-20) Before analysing the data, have the team understood the area they have chosen to work on? Is the problem statement understood? Have the team understood the data columns provided? What were the potential solutions considered during the initial brainstorm? 

1a. Problem definition and Data Collection (score 1-20) Is the project problem statement/idea clearly defined? Have the team identified why their research topic has significance? Does it show creative thinking? Or does it build on existing knowledge? Have the team explained their data collection approach? Pros/Cons of approach?

2.Expert Advice (score 1-15) How did they make use of expert help e.g. from industry/academia? Who did they contact? What was their level of involment? How often? How did they use the advice to improve?

3. Analysis and Insights (score 1-20) What tools were used to analyse the data? Why? What data manipulation techniques did they learn? What data analysis techniques did they use? Why? Have the team extracted relevant insights from the data to answer the problem statement? What other insights have they found within the data?

4.Presentation of Results (score 1-15) Was the presentation structured? Did the team make points in a clear and coherent way? Did the teams approach, findings and concluding arguments make logical sense? Did the team use visual aids effectively? Were questions answered satisfactorily?

5.Planning and Project Management (score 1-15) How well have the team planned and managed the whole process of collecting, analysing and documenting their data analysis? What would they have done differently?

6.Data Science (1-15) What did the team learn about working with data? Did they develop their spreadsheet or coding skills? Have they been inspired to tackle different topics of interest? Has it changed their thinking in any way? Have they learnt more about a particular area of Science, Technology, Engineering or Maths?

 

Teacher/Technician/Librarian of the Year Award

TeenTech appreciate that behind every student project entered for the TeenTech Awards lies the dedication, time and organisational skills of a teacher, technician , librarian or youth leader who has taken on the considerable extra work and planning that entering a competition of this type involves.

We want to acknowledge and celebrate the work you put in to help students benefit from extra-curricula activities like this. We were immensely touched by the way so many teams thanked their teacher for giving them the opportunity to take part and we want to acknowledge this effort.

In 2018 TeenTech Teacher Award certificates will be sent to teachers whose students submit projects for the Awards. All teachers whose students submit Stage 2 entries in March 2018 and complete a short summary of how they have led the Award programme will be considered for the ‘Teacher of the Year” Award but teachers are eligible to receive the Award, whether or not their teams qualify for the final.

£1000 will be given to the teacher, technician, librarian, trainer youth leader or whom the judges consider has evidenced the best implementation of the TeenTech Awards in their institution. We don’t want this to cause any extra work on top of what you already do – we want to celebrate and publicise the work of good teachers.

When students submit their electronic projects in March please send us a (under 500 word) report on how you have run the Awards in your school and the benefits to pupils.

Finalists will be invited to The Royal Society and asked to give a short presentation to judges describing how they supported and guided students through their project planning and development.

Those selected as finalists may not necessarily have teams in the final themselves but may have used the Awards well to support student academic, practical and personal development in their school

Judges

All judges will be appointed by TeenTech CIC. The judges will not enter into any discussion about judging entries. All decisions by judges are final.

General Rules

Please read the rules carefully.

Entry to the TeenTech Awards Competition is free of charge.

Schools must register the categories they wish to enter but work does not have to be completed until March 29th  or the end of the Spring Term 2018.

Entries must be made by a UK, Eire or International school, parent or guardian on behalf of teams of up to three students.

All students must be UK, Eire or International students in year groups 7-11 or 12-13 or the equivalent in December 2017

A UK team may collaborate with an international team and visa versa. The UK team is responsible for managing the entry.

A UK team may be made up of students from different UK schools

Projects must not previously have reached the final of any national or international competition.

Schools may enter one team in each of the categories numbered 1-13 (Year 7-11) (so a maximum of 13 teams) and 10 teams across the categories 16-18.  You may also ask for an element of your entries to be considered where appropriate for the Digital Skills or Manufacturing prizes.

Schools may also enter stand-alone projects in the Digital Skills category or Manufacturing categories.

Individual students may only enter categories 1-13 or 16-18 once, as a member of a team.

It is possible that some categories may become oversubscribed and TeenTech may have to restrict the number of entries for these categories. Early category registration is advised.

There will be one winning team in each of the innovation categories. Each of these teams will receive a prize of £1000. There will also be in-kind prizes for students.

Winners will be announced at the TeenTech Awards ceremony in June 2018.

A full list of prize winners will be published on the TeenTech website following the Awards ceremony.

By entering the competition entrants will be deemed to have agreed to be bound by these General Rules.

Plagiarism is prohibited. Entries must be the original work of the students.

Where students have collaborated closely with a company, the entry must clearly indicate how the students have contributed to the final product and schools must verify their work.

TeenTech CIC will treat information submitted to it for the competition purely for the purposes of running the competition. This information will not be provided to any third parties other than a panel of judges chosen by TeenTech CIC.

By entering this competition you are agreeing to the condition that you will attend the TeenTech Awards Ceremony and present if selected.

Schools, Colleges and Libraries registering for the TeenTech Awards agree to allow TeenTech CIC to reference their name(s) on the TeenTech website www.teentech.com and on other marketing material; and to allow TeenTech CIC to use any images for promotional purposes.

TeenTech CIC reserves the right to revise the rules and regulations at any time.

Team- Specific Rules

Teams can be made up of a maximum of three students from UK, EIRE or International schools.

Teams may seek feedback on aspects of their project from an unlimited number of students, mentors academic institutions and companies in or outside the UK. Please note that only the original team of three may attend the final at The Royal Society and in the event of success, attend the prize giving.

Team members must be in year groups 7 to 11 or 12-13 (or the equivalent overseas) at the date of entry submission.

Schools may enter a different team in each of the categories 1-13 or in the case of older students, 10 teams across categories 16-18.

A team may only be entered for one category i.e. they cannot be entered in multiple categories with the exception of the manufacturing, research and information literacy and digital skills categories.

A student may only be a member of one team with the exception of the digital skills, research and information literacy and manufacturing categories.

How to Run the Awards

We want the TeenTech Awards to be an inspiring experience for every student who takes part. The aim is to encourage them to investigate STEM subjects, to see their relevance to everyday life and inspire them to consider careers they never realised existed. Many schools and colleges are now running the Awards across entire year groups and then holding a ‘Dragons Den’ to choose the entries. We have an ‘eight week plan’ as a suggested framework which we will send to all schools who register but you are welcome to run the Awards your own way!

Remember we have a set of certificates so you can give individual students or teams recognition for their achievements along the way. You might award them at certain stages or during a prize-giving ceremony once the final entries are submitted. Please ask us to send these if you have not received them.

 

How to become a TeenTech Centre of Innovation and Creativity

Your school, college or library could become a TeenTech Centre of Innovation and Creativity.  We will reward schools running strong programmes led by ourselves or other external, established organisations which lead to students developing core skills in creativity, teamwork, communication, collaboration, tenacity and confidence.

We have developed a Silver and Gold status and the criteria to achieve these can be found here.

 

How  your students can become TeenTech Young Ambassadors

We know that students who are near the age of young people in their school or local community have considerable impact in helping them understandtheir potential to make a difference using science, technology and engineering.

 

Your students can use the experience they have enjoyed in the TeenTech Awards programme in many different ways to inspire others to follow in their footsteps.  Many students act as mentors to younger students or run tech clubs within their own schools becoming very powerful role models and mentors.  They will earn Young Ambassador status.

 

We have some powerful case studies and more information on this intiative on our website here.

GOOD LUCK!

We wish you the very best and hope you enjoy the whole process. TeenTech is all about building relationships and we hope that the contacts you make will be valuable and long lasting.

 

If you have any questions please contact us on awards@teentechevent.com or mailto:dani@teentechawards.com

 

Finalist presentations at the TeenTech Awards.

TeenTech will provide you with an exhibition space and the judges will award additional points for quality of the presentation material supporting your innovation, the clarity and confidence of the team demonstrating their project and the completeness of illustration / prototype of the innovation itself.

All finalists will be provided with full information for the judging day in June at the beginning of the Summer Term